Open Access News

New Commission guidance supports EU Member States in transition to Open Science

The European Commission has made a crucial step on the way to an Open Science system in which knowledge circulates freely, as soon as it is available, through digital and collaborative technology. The revised Recommendation on access to and preservation of scientific information, published today as part of the Digital Single Market package, lays out the blueprint for policies on open access to publications and data that the EU Member States can put in place.

The guidelines will give even better support to excellent research across Europe, which will in turn result in scientific, economic and social benefits for the Member States and the Union as a whole. To reap as many of these benefits as possible, it is especially important that open access policies are coordinated across the EU as part of the European Research Area.

Tracing data – data ci­ta­tion road­map for Fin­land

The data citation road­map con­sists of an eva­lua­tion of the cur­rent si­tua­tion, desc­rip­tion of the tar­get sta­te and recom­men­da­tions on mea­su­res that would lead from the cur­rent si­tua­tion to the tar­get sta­te. It also pre­sents an in­for­ma­tion mo­del for data re­ferences. 

The roadmap has been produced by the Finnish Committee for Research Data (FCRD) in dialogue with other members of the Finnish research community. The Ministry of Education and Culture Open Science and Research Initiative has instigated and funded the work. 

Data citation is considered to be one of the core processes of an open scholarly research system. Thus far, data citation practices are poorly implemented worldwide, but once established, they are expected to facilitate the crediting of data work, providing attribution detail, facilitating access, fostering collaboration, and ensuring transparency and reproducibility of science and scholarship. Finland has an opportunity to set an example to other national research systems, thus solidifying our position as a global leader in open science. 

To ensure international interoperability the Tracing Data Project has used the FORCE11 Data Citation Synthesis Group: Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles (2014) as a key reference as well as a conceptual framework. The full declaration can be found at www.force11.org/datacitation

Download the full roadmap.

UNIFI demands immediate Open Access

Universities Finland UNIFI considers it to be important that Open Access principles will be implemented quickly and therefore gives its full support to the FinELib consortium’s goals in the negotiations with international science publishers.

Promoting open publishing is in line with Open Science and Data Action Programme which was created under the guidance of UNIFI in Spring 2018. One of the key measures suggested in the Programme is producing a national open publication policy. As a part of this policy it is important to create a plan for the negotiations with international science publishers.

UNIFI states that open publishing should be advanced quickly. According to the European initiative Plan S, which was launched on 4th September 2018, publications resulting from research funded by public grants must be published in Open Access journals or on Open Access platforms by 2020.

UNIFI gives its full support to FinELib’s negotiation goals. They include, among other things, that researchers must have a possibility to publish their articles on Open Access platforms without supplementary costs. Also, it is important that open publishing will not increase the total costs resulting from scientific publishing and from the use of scientific journals. FinELib’s negotiation principles and UNIFI’s statement can be read here.

Plan S – Accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access to scientific publications

On 4 September 2018, a group national research funding organisation, with the support of the European Commission and the European Research Council (ERC), announced the launch of cOAlition S, an initiative to make full and immediate Open Access to research publications a reality. It is built around Plan S, which consists of one target and 10 principles.

cOAlition S signals the commitment to implement, by 1 January 2020, the necessary measures to fulfil its main principle: By 2020 scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants provided by participating national and European research councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant Open Access Journals or on compliant Open Access Platforms.”

In addition:

  • Authors retain copyright of their publication with no restrictions. All publications must be published under an open license, preferably the Creative Commons Attribution Licence CC BY. In all cases, the license applied should fulfil the requirements defined by the Berlin Declaration;
  • The Funders will ensure jointly the establishment of robust criteria and requirements for the services that compliant high quality Open Access journals and Open Access platforms must provide;
  • In case such high quality Open Access journals or platforms do not yet exist, the Funders will, in a coordinated way, provide incentives to establish and support them when appropriate; support will also be provided for Open Access infrastructures where necessary;
  • Where applicable, Open Access publication fees are covered by the Funders or universities, not by individual researchers; it is acknowledged that all scientists should be able to publish their work Open Access even if their institutions have limited means;
  • When Open Access publication fees are applied, their funding is standardised and capped (across Europe);
  • The Funders will ask universities, research organisations, and libraries to align their policies and strategies, notably to ensure transparency;
  • The above principles shall apply to all types of scholarly publications, but it is understood that the timeline to achieve Open Access for monographs and books may be longer than 1 January 2020;
  • The importance of open archives and repositories for hosting research outputs is acknowledged because of their long-term archiving function and their potential for editorial innovation;
  • The ‘hybrid’ model of publishing is not compliant with the above principles;
  • The Funders will monitor compliance and sanction non-compliance.

More information: https://www.scienceeurope.org/coalition-s/ 

Access to Taylor & Francis and Wiley electronic journals at risk

Ongoing negotiations in a challenging situation

If the negotiations with FinELib consortium and publishers Taylor & Francis and Wiley aren’t going to be successful there will be no more access in JYU to electronic journals of these publishers starting February 2019. All Finnish universities which have the agreement with these publishers are facing the same situation. There have been access to 1800 T&F journals (list.pdf) and 1300 Wiley journals (list.pdf) in JYU.

If there will be no more access to these journals there are several alternative ways to gain access to articles. (e.g. Finding Open Access Articles and FinELib's Alternative access).

Read more about the ongoing negotiations on FinELib's web page.

FinELib is a consortium of Finnish universities, research institutions and public libraries. It negotiates e-resource license agreements for the Finnish scholarly community.


Enquiries:

Director, Ari Muhonen, OSC
Service Manager, Irene Ylönen, OSC
Information Specialist, Arto Ikonen, OSC

Head of Services, Arja Tuuliniemi, FinELib (finelib@helsinki.fi)

Negotiations with Taylor & Francis hit the wall

Negotiations between the FinELib consortium and Taylor & Francis ended with no positive results. The end of the negotiations means that access to Taylor & Francis journals will end on 1 February 2019.

“This is an unfortunate situation. We are ready to continue the negotiations, provided that the publisher sets more reasonable demands”, says Arja Tuuliniemi who is in charge of FinELib services. “Universities and research institutions in Finland are highly committed to promoting open access publishing. However, the change towards open access cannot mean that scientific publications become more expensive.”

Read more: http://finelib.fi/finelibs-negotiations-with-taylor-trancis-hit-a-wall/

Alternative ways to search articles: https://openscience.jyu.fi/en/find-open-access-articles/finding-oa

Additional time for negotiations with Wiley

The 2018 agreement between FinELib and Wiley will be extended until the end of 2019 under current terms and journal contents. This affords additional time for the negotiations to reach an agreement advancing open access.

Read more: http://finelib.fi/additional-time-for-negotiations-with-wiley/

The revised Plan S principles and implementation guidance

cOAlition S released a revised version of the Plan S principles after receiving feedback from funders, publishers and the research community.

One of the key changes concerns delaying the starting time from 2020 to 2021 and clarifying the usage of digital repositories.

Read more: Plan S Revised Implementation Guidance (May 2019)

JYU joins Open APC

University of Jyväskylä joins Open APC as a first Finnish university.

The Open APC initiative releases open datasets on fees paid for open access journal articles by universities and research institutions.

Open APC is part of INTACT project by Bielefeld University & Max Planck Digital Library. It aims at establishing transparent and efficient procedures to manage article processing charges (APC) for open access publications. 

Intact Project: Transparent Infrastructure for Article Charges

Dutch copyright law helps open access

Dutch Copyright Act allows researchers to share short scientific works (e.g. articles & book chapters), regardless of any restrictive publishers' guidelines.

The Dutch universities have decided to give open access an extra boost from 2019 by starting a pilot. On the basis of the Taverne Amendment, the publishers' versions of short scientific works can be made available after six months via the university repository.

Read more: You share, we take care!

University of Jyväskylä supports Open Library of Humanities

Open Science Centre has joined Open Library of Humanities Partnership Subsidy program.

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access
scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international
consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more
accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.

Further information:
University of Jyväskylä joins OLH LPS Model
Open Library of the Humanities - A better path to open access for the humanities

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